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English definition of “start”

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start

noun
 
 
/stɑːt/
[C, usually singular] the beginning of something: get off to a bad/good/slow start The FTSE 100 got off to another good start and climbed steadily through the morning The shares have fallen from 418p at the start of the year to 121p today. Accessibility is something you must think about right from the start when you're choosing your venue. Johnson led the project from start to finish.
[S] the act of beginning to do something: make a start on sth/doing sth European funding has been obtained to enable us to make a start on the project.
[C, usually plural] a business or job that has just begun, or a person who has just started a new job: Construction spending, driven by starts of new factories and highways, rose a larger-than-expected 0.9%. They have been providing reliable data on small business starts and closures since 2003. All new starts are expected to sign the workplace agreement.
[C, usually singular] an opportunity to begin something and start to be successful at it: She got her start with the company as an accountant, auditing their books.
[S] →  head start
a fresh start a situation in which you start something again in a completely new and different way after you have been unsuccessful: The program will allow economically strapped taxpayers to make a fresh start.
→  See also head start , housing starts
(Definition of start noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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