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English definition of “stretch”

stretch

verb
 
 
/stretʃ/
[I] if money or other resources stretch to something, they are enough to buy or pay for something: MPs and many within the pensions industry are concerned £400m will not stretch far enough.stretch to sth Our budget won't stretch to hiring any new workers.
[T] to make money or resources last longer than was originally planned: City officials are currently struggling with how to stretch limited water supplies.
[T] if something stretches money or other resources, it uses nearly all the money or resources available so that there is very little left: be stretched to breaking point/the limit The aviation infrastructure has been stretched to breaking point.be stretched thin When people and funding are stretched thin, companies may find they're not putting enough resources behind the ideas that promise the greatest shareholder returns.stretch a budget/finances The takeover will stretch the company's finances.
[T] MARKETING to use a brand that already exists to sell new and different products and services: The company is trying to stretch its brand to cover anything that can be sold online.
[T] to force someone to use all their intelligence or skills: My current job isn't really stretching me enough.
(Definition of stretch verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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