Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “subject”

subject

adjective
 
 
/ˈsʌbdʒɪkt/
subject to sth likely to have or experience a particular thing, especially something unpleasant: be subject to a charge/fee/tariff You may be subject to additional bank charges for currency conversion. The company could be subject to a hostile takeover. Income from investment of the capital will be subject to tax. depending on the stated thing happening: The $1.14 billion project is subject to approval by the board. Outline planning permission has been granted, subject to a public inquiry, for a new 10,000-seat stadium on the land. Tax laws are subject to change. The notice period for clients to leave the agency are subject to contract. under the political control or authority of something: The casinos are located on tribal lands not subject to state or local laws.
subject to average INSURANCE used about an insurance agreement when the amount of insurance on a property is less than the real value of the property, so the amount paid out by the company will be reduced: You must adequately insure yourself otherwise you may find yourself subject to average.
(Definition of subject from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of subject?
Browse related topics

You are looking at an entry to do with Creating a distraction, but you might be interested in these topics from the Attention and care topic area:

Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

More Business English definitions for “subject”

Definitions of “subject” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

bright spark

a person who is intelligent, and full of energy and enthusiasm

Word of the Day

Highly delighted, bitterly disappointed, ridiculously cheap: adverbs for emphasis.

by Liz Walter,
October 22, 2014
We often make adjectives stronger by putting an adverb in front of them. The most common ones are very and, for a stronger meaning, extremely: He was very pleased. The ship is extremely large. However, we don’t use very or extremely for adjectives that already have a strong meaning, for example fantastic,

Read More 

life tracking noun

October 20, 2014
the use of one or more devices or apps to monitor health, exercise, how time is spent, etc.

Read More