subject - definition in the Business English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “subject”

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subject

adjective
 
 
/ˈsʌbdʒɪkt/
subject to sth likely to have or experience a particular thing, especially something unpleasant: be subject to a charge/fee/tariff You may be subject to additional bank charges for currency conversion. The company could be subject to a hostile takeover. Income from investment of the capital will be subject to tax. depending on the stated thing happening: The $1.14 billion project is subject to approval by the board. Outline planning permission has been granted, subject to a public inquiry, for a new 10,000-seat stadium on the land. Tax laws are subject to change. The notice period for clients to leave the agency are subject to contract. under the political control or authority of something: The casinos are located on tribal lands not subject to state or local laws.
subject to average INSURANCE used about an insurance agreement when the amount of insurance on a property is less than the real value of the property, so the amount paid out by the company will be reduced: You must adequately insure yourself otherwise you may find yourself subject to average.
Translations of “subject”
in Vietnamese lệ thuộc, dưới quyền…
in Spanish dominado, subyugado…
in Thai ซึ่งขึ้นอยู่กับ…
in Malaysian dijajah…
in French assujetti…
in German abhängig…
in Chinese (Traditional) 擁有…
in Indonesian terjajah…
in Chinese (Simplified) 拥有…
(Definition of subject from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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