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English definition of “suspend”

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suspend

verb [T]
 
 
/səˈspend/
to stop something, either temporarily or permanently, from happening or continuing: The group's shares were suspended at 199p while the takeover deal was finalized.suspend production/service/trading The Stock Exchange will suspend trading in the group's shares if they do not secure financing over the next two weeks.suspend accounts/payments If users ignore messages warning them not to download files illegally, their accounts could be suspended. indefinitely/permanently/temporarily suspended
HR, POLITICS if an organization suspends an employee or member, it temporarily stops them from working or from being a member, often because they have done something wrong: suspend sb from sth/doing sth She was suspended from her £150,000-a-year job for six months. Pakistan was suspended from the Commonwealth for failing to lift emergency rule by the deadline.be suspended for 6 days/2 weeks/3 months, etc. Mr Morris, who has been suspended for a year, expects to return to his job after a meeting of governors. The director was suspended on full pay pending the outcome of the investigation.
LAW to give someone a punishment, especially a prison sentence, that will not be carried out if they do not do anything else illegal within a particular period: She was given an 18-month suspended sentence for her part in the fraud. He pleaded guilty and was given a 12-month sentence suspended for 12 months.
(Definition of suspend from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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