take verb Meaning in Cambridge Business English Dictionary
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Meaning of "take" - Business English Dictionary

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take

verb [T]
 
 
/teɪk/ (took, taken)
( also take away) to subtract one number or amount from another: take sth from sth You'll need to take $2,000 from the $8,000 to allow for tax.
to remove something or someone from somewhere: take sth/sb off (sth) What are we left with after we take off our costs? I asked for her name to be taken off the list. They decided to take him off the job and assign him to another department.take sth away The police took away all of the files for investigation.
to accept or receive something: Do you take credit cards?take an order We're taking 5,000 orders a day. Top executives will take a 10% pay cut. He took a job as salesman in a local company. Are you going to take the job if you get offered it?
( US also take in) COMMERCE to receive money from sales or as payment for something: They took an astonishing $100,000 in their first week. The company will make money by taking 5% from each bet.
COMMERCE to buy or choose something: The good news is that they have decided to take 200 units a year. 50% of our total production is taken by just three customers.
to need something: It takes determination to succeed in a new business venture.
if something takes a particular amount of time, that time is needed in order to finish it: They estimated that the project would take about 6 months to complete.
have (got) what it takes to have the necessary qualities or abilities to do something: Have you got what it takes to be in charge of a department? If you don't have what it takes, you're not going to last long.
take it or leave it used when you are offering something to someone to say that you will not improve your offer: And that's our final offer. Take it or leave it.
take part (in sth) to be involved in something with other people: Most of the board members took part in the discussions.
take stock to think carefully about a situation or event and form an opinion about it, so that you can decide what to do: When markets touch new highs, investors need to take stock. I am currently taking stock of our position. ACCOUNTING →  stocktake
take time to need a lot of time: It's going to take time to get this department running smoothly again.
(Definition of take verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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