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English definition of “toll”

toll

noun
 
 
/təʊl/
[C] TRANSPORT an amount of money that you have to pay to use a road or bridge: Motorists in the region paid more than $11.6 million in tolls last year.pay/collect a toll Vehicles would be fitted with an electronic tag allowing drivers to pay tolls by credit card, over the phone or electronically. road/bridge/motorway tolls a toll bridge/highway/motorway
[C] INTERNET, COMMUNICATIONS an amount of money that you have to pay to use the internet or to visit particular websites: Cable companies must treat all online traffic equally, without imposing higher tolls for certain content.
[C] US COMMUNICATIONS the cost of a long-distance phone call
[S] the total number of bad things or amount of damage that happens as a result of something: The final toll of bankruptcies for this year is high. The death toll from the earthquake was over a million.financial/economic/emotional toll Layoffs carry a large human and financial toll.
to take its/their toll (on sth/sb) if something takes its toll, it causes damage: The recession is taking its toll on small businesses. The building was once a model of its kind, but years of neglect have taken their toll. Stress can take a heavy toll on your health.
(Definition of toll from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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