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English definition of “transfer”

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transfer

verb
 
 
/trænsˈfɜːr/ (-rr-)
[T] to move someone or something from one place to another: transfer sb/sth to sth The company is to transfer 1500 jobs to India by the end of the year. Anyone transferring a pension from one company to another could be hit by early exit penalties. The idea is to transfer all the firm's operational business to the web.
[I or T] WORKPLACE to change to a different job, team, place of work, or situation, or to make someone do this: transfer to sth A small number of employees will be offered a chance to transfer to California.transfer sb to sth The manager transferred him to another store.transfer between sth You can transfer between ISA providers during the tax year.
[T] BANKING, FINANCE to move money from one account to another: transfer sth to/into sth The money will be transferred into your bank account. He opened an instant access account and transferred his savings.
[T] IT to move data from one computer, system, etc. to another: transfer sth to sth All forms have been transferred to disk.
[T] LAW to make something the legal property of another person: transfer sth to sb Married couples do not have to pay this tax if property is transferred from one to the other after death.
[T] COMMUNICATIONS to pass a phone call from one phone to another: transfer sb to sb Please hold while I transfer you to my supervisor.
(Definition of transfer verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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