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English definition of “transmit”

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transmit

verb
 
 
/trænzˈmɪt/ (-tt-)
[I or T] COMMUNICATIONS, IT to send out electrical signals using a radio, television, or computer network: transmit data/information Bluetooth chips allow mobile phone users to transmit data over short distances to other mobile phones.transmit a signal/code/message Voice over Internet Protocol transmits messages in small data packets.be transmitted to sb/sth The company's in-house television station is transmitted to handheld devices owned by its employees.be transmitted digitally/electronically Orders may be transmitted electronically from or to the Floor of the Exchange.
[T] to send something to another person or place: transmit sth to sb Your bank will transmit funds by wire to our central bank in New York. be transmitted to sb/sth Tender offer materials that are transmitted to security holders must include the information required by paragraph (d)(1) of this section.
[T] to broadcast a programme on television, radio, or the internet: The BBC didn't transmit the documentary again, due to its controversial content.
[T] to cause or spread a disease so that a person or group of people is infected: be transmitted to sb Scientists say the disease is transmitted to humans by eating infected beef.be transmitted by sth/sb Malaria is transmitted by mosquitoes from human to human.
[T] to communicate information, knowledge, beliefs, etc. to others: Training appears to be an effective way to transmit information about diversity and its importance The company uses the system of professional mentorship in order to transmit family values.
(Definition of transmit from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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