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English definition of “travel”

travel

verb [I or T]
 
 
/ˈtrævəl/ ( UK -ll-, US -l-)
to go from one place to another, especially over a long distance, in a plane, train, car, etc.: The ability to travel easily in and out of the region is a significant factor for professionals doing business here. Due to the increasing costs of travelling abroad, more Americans are choosing to stay closer to home during their vacation. He travels around 200,000 miles a year on business. A delegation of officials will be traveling to New Orleans to lobby for the cash.travel around/across/through somewhere Riding a bike is often the most efficient way to travel around big citiestravel by air/train/car How long does it take to travel by train from Glasgow to London?travel the world/the country/the state She has travelled the world in her work as foreign correspondent.
to move at a particular speed or over a particular distance: An electric motor powers the car at all speeds, and it can travel 40 miles on batteries alone.travel at 40mph/80kph, etc. A train travelling at 30 mph takes about a mile to bring to a stop.
(Definition of travel verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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