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English definition of “travel”

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travel

noun [U]
 
 
/ˈtrævəl/
the activity of going from one place to another, especially over a long distance, in a plane, train, car, etc.,: A survey revealed that federal employees were routinely abusing rules regarding business-class travel. He was reimbursed for the cost of travel between his home and workplace. The travel and tourism industry employs more than 187,000 people in North Carolina. Make copies of important travel documents like your passport and itinerary. air/rail/space travel overseas/international/foreign travel business/leisure/holiday travel free/cheap travel travel company/firm/industry travel arrangements/plans travel expenses/coststravel on/in sth Purchase of a smart card entitles you to three days' unlimited travel on the Metro, buses, and trams.travel to/from/between somewhere The Chairman has a constant round of meetings, involving travel to Western Europe and throughout the UK.
Translations of “travel”
in Korean 여행…
in Arabic يُسافِر…
in Portuguese viagens, viagar…
in Catalan viatges…
in Japanese 旅行, 旅…
in Italian il viaggiare…
in Chinese (Traditional) 旅行, 遊歷…
in Russian путешествие…
in Turkish yolculuk, seyahat…
in Chinese (Simplified) 旅行, 游历…
in Polish podróżowanie, podróż…
(Definition of travel noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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