trial noun Meaning in Cambridge Business English Dictionary
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Meaning of "trial" - Business English Dictionary

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trial

noun
 
 
/ˈtraɪəl/
[C] PRODUCTION a test to discover how safe, effective, etc. a product is: a clinical/drug/field trial The company conducted three clinical trials to determine the drug's safety. conduct/run/undergo trials
[C or U] PRODUCTION, HR the process of using a product or employing a person for a short period in order to decide how effective or suitable they are: Under the scheme, employers fill a vacancy with a long-term unemployed individual on a trial basis for up to 15 working days. You can buy the equipment on trial and take it back if you don't like it. Agents are usually appointed for a trial period.
[C or U] LAW in a court of law, the process of judging whether a person is guilty of a crime or deciding a legal problem, which involves hearing statements, showing objects, etc.: await/face/stand trial He was ordered to stand trial on charges of unlawful computer use.be/go/be put on trial for sth The former chief executive is on trial for fraud. The company is scheduled to go to trial next year. get/be given a fair trial
trial and error a way of achieving something or solving a problem by trying a number of different methods and learning from the mistakes you make: Although some products' quality can be verified through trial and error, this is not always practical. →  See also acceptance trial , blind trial , free trial
(Definition of trial noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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