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English definition of “unequal”

unequal

adjective
 
 
/ʌnˈiːkwəl/
not divided or given in the same amounts to all the people or organizations in a group, so that some people or organizations have more money, resources, etc. than others: Pension provision is becoming increasingly unequal, with around a third of the workforce facing inadequate pensions. The government faces renewed pressure to tackle unequal pay.an unequal distribution of wealth/power/land Experts say the country has one of the most unequal distributions of wealth in the developing world.
unfair in a way that is harmful or dishonest: A new study by the Law Society indicated that unequal treatment for women solicitors was still continuing. According to a recent survey, Britain is the most unequal society in western Europe.
used to describe a situation in which a person or organization cannot succeed, for example, because the competition is too strong: an unequal contest/struggle/battle Food prices are increasingly dictated by the large supermarkets, and many farmers are giving up the unequal struggle and leaving the land.
be unequal to sth to not have the skills, money, or resources that are necessary to do or achieve something: Ultimately, the management team was unequal to the task of paying off the mountain of debt it had taken on.
(Definition of unequal from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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