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English definition of “working”

working

adjective [before noun]
 
 
/ˈwɜːkɪŋ/
used to describe people who work and earn money: Too many working people are piling up debt on high-interest credit cards. When employers ignore health and safety regulations, working men and women are needlessly put at risk. Child care costs can be a significant burden for a working couple with children. working couples/families/mothers
used to describe someone who does a job that usually is not very well paid and usually does not need a very high level of education: a working man/woman In our celebrity-obsessed culture, the values of the ordinary working man are being ignored.
relating to someone's job, or to work in general: Older people encounter much prejudice about their ability to adapt to new working methods. My manager and I have developed a close working relationship. a working environment/culture
used to describe a plan, idea, or knowledge that is not complete but that is satisfactory for now: The working title of her book is "Attracting Wealth". Applicants will need a working knowledge of French and Spanish. a working assumption/hypothesis/definition
used to describe a machine or the parts of a machine that move and operate it: After three failed prototypes, we finally have a working model.
MEETINGS used to describe a meal at which you also work or discuss business: a working breakfast/lunch/dinner Over a working lunch the HR team and a local architect studied office refurbishment plans.
be in (good) working order a machine or piece of equipment that is in good working order works safely and effectively: All our vehicles are in good and efficient working order.
→ See also hard-working
(Definition of working adjective from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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