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Arabic translation of “miss”

miss

verb
 
/mɪs/
A2 to feel sad about someone or something that you have stopped seeing or having
يَفْتَقِد
I’ll miss you when you go. He misses having a room of his own.
A2 to not go to something
يُفَوِّت
I missed my class this morning.
A2 to arrive too late to get on a bus, train, or plane
يُفَوِّت الميعاد
If I don’t leave now, I’ll miss my train.
B1 to not see or hear something
لَم يَلْحَظ / لَم يَسْمَع
Sorry, I missed that – could you repeat it please?
B1 to avoid doing or experiencing something
يُفَوِّت
You should leave early if you want to miss the traffic.
miss a chance/an opportunity B1 to not use an opportunity to do something
يُفَوِّت الفُرصة
She missed the chance to speak to him.
to fail to hit or catch something, or to fail to score a goal
يُخْطِيء فى التِقاط
The bomb missed its target. It should have been an easy shot, but he missed.
to fail to do something at the correct time or to be too late to do something or see something or someone
يُفَوِّت
I must finish this letter or I’ll miss the post. I have to finish this paper or I’ll miss the deadline. I was sorry I missed you at Pat’s party – I must have arrived after you left.
miss the point to not understand something correctly
لَم يَعرِف
He seems to be missing the point completely.
(Definition of miss verb from the Cambridge English-Arabic Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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