draw translate English to Catalan: Cambridge Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Translation of "draw" - English-Catalan dictionary

draw

verb
 
/drɔː/ ( past tense drew, past participle drawn)
A1 to make a picture with a pen or pencil
dibuixar
She drew a picture of a tree.
to attract someone to a place or person
atreure
He’s an excellent speaker who always draws a crowd.
to move somewhere, usually in a vehicle
moure’s
The train drew into the station.
to pull something or someone in a particular direction
moure
He took her hand and drew her towards him.
draw near/close to become nearer in space or time
acostar-se
Her wedding is drawing nearer every day.
draw attention to someone/something to make someone notice something or someone
atreure l’atenció (cap a)
We think she wears those strange clothes to draw attention to herself.
draw the curtains to pull curtains open or closed
descórrer/tirar les cortines
( also draw out) to take money from your bank account
treure
UK to finish a game or competition with each team or player having the same score
empatar (en)
England drew 2–2 against Italy.
(Definition of draw from the Cambridge English-Catalan Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day
coeducational

having male and female students being taught together in the same school or college rather than separately

Word of the Day

Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
by Cambridge Dictionaries Online,
August 27, 2015
The English language is constantly changing. You know that. But did you know that at Cambridge Dictionaries Online we keep track of the changes? We continually add new words and new meanings to our online dictionary for learners of English. Some of them are new to English entirely (neologisms), and some

Read More 

hyperpalatable adjective
hyperpalatable adjective
August 24, 2015
describes food with heightened levels of sugar and salt, intended to be extremely appealing In Brazil, where the prevalence of overweight and obese adults has doubled since 1980, crisps, biscuits, energy bars and sugary drinks formulated to be ‘hyper-palatable’ are much more widely eaten than previously.

Read More