bottom noun (LOWEST PART) translate to Mandarin Chinese

Translation of "bottom" - English-Mandarin Chinese dictionary


/ˈbɒt.əm/ US  /ˈbɑː.t̬əm/
[C usually singular] the lowest part of something
He stood at the bottom of the stairs and called up to me.
Extra information will be found at the bottom of the page.
The ship had sunk to the bottom of the sea/the sea bottom.
UK They live at the bottom of our street (= the other end of the street from us).
UK The apple tree at the bottom (= end) of the garden is beginning to blossom.
At school, Einstein was (at the) bottom of (= the least successful student in) his class.
The manager of the hotel started at the bottom (= in one of the least important jobs) 30 years ago, as a porter.
The rich usually get richer, while the people at the bottom (= at the lowest position in society) stay there.
Edges and extremities of objectsSurfaces of objectsSurfaces of objectsEdges and extremities of objects
bottoms [plural] the lower part of a piece of clothing that consists of two parts
I've found my bikini bottoms but not my top.
Have you seen my pyjama/tracksuit bottoms anywhere?
Clothing - general words
(Definition of bottom noun (LOWEST PART) from the Cambridge English-Chinese (Simplified) Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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