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Chinese (Simplified) translation of “know”

know

verb (HAVE INFORMATION)
掌握信息
 
 
/nəʊ/ US  /noʊ/ (knew, known)
[I or T, not continuous] to have information in your mind
知道,熟悉,了解
"Where did he go?" "I don't know."
“他上哪儿去了?”“我不知道。”
"What does it cost?" "Ask Kate. She'll know."
“这个要多少钱?”“问凯特,她知道。”
She knows the name of every kid in the school.
她知道学校里每个孩子的名字。
I don't know anything about this.
我对此一无所知。
[+ question word] We don't know when he's arriving.
我们不知道他什么时候到。
I don't know (= understand) what all the fuss is about.
我不明白这么大惊小怪干什么。
[+ (that)] I just knew (that) it was going to be a disaster.
我就知道这会是场灾难。
She knew (= was aware) (that) something was wrong.
她知道出错了。
[+ obj + to infinitive ] Even small amounts of these substances are known to cause skin problems.
我们知道这类物质即使是一丁点也会损害皮肤。
formal The authorities know him to be (= know that he is) a cocaine dealer.
当局知道他是个可卡因贩子。
Knowing and learning
[T not continuous] used to ask someone to tell you a piece of information
(用于询问信息)知道
Do you know the time?
你知道几点了吗?
[+ question word] Do you know where the Post Office is?
你知道邮局在哪儿吗?
Knowing and learning
[I or T, not continuous] to be certain
确知;确信
[+ (that)] I know (that) she'll be really pleased to hear the news.
我确信她知道这个消息会很高兴的。
[+ question word] I don't know whether I should tell her or not.
我不知道是否该告诉她。
The party is at Sarah's house as/so far as I know (= I think but I am not certain).
据我所知,聚会在萨拉家举行。
Knowing and learning
(Definition of know verb (HAVE INFORMATION) from the Cambridge English-Chinese (Simplified) Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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