oust - Definition in the Cambridge English-Chinese (Simplified) Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Chinese (Simplified) translation of “oust”

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oust

verb [T]
 
 
/aʊst/
to force someone to leave a position of power, job, place or competition
将…赶下台;罢免;废黜;赶走;淘汰
The president was ousted (from power) in a military coup in January 1987.
总统在1987年1月的一次军事政变中被赶下了台。
Police are trying to oust drug dealers from the city centre.
警方正试图将毒品贩子们从市中心撵走。
The champions were defeated by Arsenal and ousted from the League Cup.
冠军们被阿森纳队打败并被淘汰出了联赛杯。
Firing staff and being fired
Translations of “oust”
in Vietnamese hất cẳng…
in Spanish desbancar, expulsar…
in Thai ขับไล่…
in Malaysian menggulingkan…
in French évincer…
in German verdrängen…
in Chinese (Traditional) 將…趕下臺, 罷免, 廢黜…
in Indonesian mengusir, menggulingkan…
in Russian свергать, вытеснять…
in Turkish atmak, kovmak, defetmek…
in Polish odsuwać (od władzy), usuwać…
(Definition of oust from the Cambridge English-Chinese (Simplified) Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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