want verb (WISH) translate to Mandarin Chinese

Translation of "want" - English-Mandarin Chinese dictionary


verb [T] (WISH)
/wɒnt/ US  /wɑːnt/
to wish for a particular thing or plan of action. 'Want' is not used in polite requests in British English
想要,希望(英国英语中礼貌的请求不用 want)
I want some chocolate.
She wants a word with you.
He's everything you'd ever want in a man - bright, funny and attractive.
[+ to infinitive] What do you want to eat?
[+ obj + to infinitive ] Do you want me to take you to the station?
[+ obj + past participle ] This letter - do you want it sent first class?
[+ obj + adj ] Do you want this pie hot?
[+ obj + -ing verb ] I don't want a load of traffic going past my house all night, waking me up.
You wait - by next year she'll be wanting a bigger house!
→  Compare like verb Wanting thingsHoping and hopefulness
to wish or need someone to be present
Am I wanted at the meeting tomorrow?
He is wanted by the police (= The police are searching for him).
Wanting thingsHoping and hopefulness
want in/out of informal to want to start or stop being involved in something
I want out of the whole venture before it's too late.
Wanting thingsHoping and hopefulness
(Definition of want verb (WISH) from the Cambridge English-Chinese (Simplified) Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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