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Chinese (Traditional) translation of “capacity”

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capacity

noun [C or S or U] (AMOUNT)
數量
 
 
/kəˈpæs.ə.ti/ US  /-t̬i/
the total amount that can be contained or produced, or (especially of a person or organization) the ability to do a particular thing
容積,容量;生產能力;(尤指某人或某組織的)辦事能力
The stadium has a seating capacity of 50 000.
這個體育場能容納五萬人。
The game was watched by a capacity crowd/audience of 50 000 (= the place was completely full).
比賽場座無虛席,五萬觀眾觀看了比賽。
She has a great capacity for hard work.
她特別能吃苦耐勞。
The purchase of 500 tanks is part of a strategy to increase military capacity by 25% over the next five years.
購買500輛坦克是在今後五年裡將軍事力量增加25%的戰略計劃的一部分。
[+ to infinitive] It seems to be beyond his capacity to (= He seems to be unable to) follow simple instructions.
他好像連簡單的指令也聽不懂。
Do you think it's within his capacity to (= Do you think he'll be able to) do the job without making a mess of it?
你認為他有能力完成這項工作而不把它搞得一團糟嗎?
The generators each have a capacity of (= can produce) 1000 kilowatts.
每台發電機都有1000千瓦的發電能力。
The larger cars have bigger capacity engines (= the engines are bigger and more powerful).
大轎車引擎功率也比較大。
All our factories are working at (full) capacity (= are producing goods as fast as possible).
我們所有的工廠都在全力生產。
We are running below capacity (= not producing as many goods as we are able to) because of cancelled orders.
因為訂單取消,我們的工廠開工不足。
He suffered a stroke in 1988, which left him unable to speak, but his mental capacity (= his ability to think and remember) wasn't affected.
1988年他得了中風,不能說話了,但是思維能力沒有受影響。
Measurements of volumeGeneral words for size and amountInformal measurements of volumeSkill, talent and ability
(Definition of capacity noun (AMOUNT) from the Cambridge English-Chinese (Traditional) Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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