cheap adjective (LOW PRICE) translate to Traditional Chinese Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Translation of "cheap" - English-Traditional Chinese dictionary

cheap

adjective (LOW PRICE) 便宜的     /tʃiːp/
costing little money or less than is usual or expected 便宜的,不貴的 I got a cheap flight at the last minute. 我在最後一刻買到了一張便宜的機票。 Food is usually cheaper in supermarkets. 超市裡的食物通常比較便宜。 Children and the elderly are entitled to cheap train tickets. 兒童和老人可以使用廉價火車票。 The scheme is simple and cheap to operate. 這個計劃實施起來簡單又省錢。 During times of mass unemployment, there's a pool of cheap labour for employers to draw from. 在人們大批失業的時候,有大量廉價勞動力供僱主選用。 figurative In a war, human life becomes very cheap (= seems to be of little value). 戰爭期間,人命變得很不值錢。 Costing or worth little or no money
If a shop or restaurant is cheap, it charges low prices (商店或餐館)收費低廉的 I go to the cheapest hairdresser's in town. 我去城裡收費最便宜的那家理髮店理髮。 Costing or worth little or no money
cheap and cheerful UK
cheap but good or enjoyable 價廉物美 There's a restaurant round the corner that serves cheap and cheerful food. 街角處有家飯店,那裡的飯菜價廉物美。 Costing or worth little or no moneyInformal words for goodGood, better and bestQuite good, or not very good
on the cheap informal
If you get goods on the cheap, you get them for a low price, often from someone you know who works in the company or business that produces them. 便宜地,廉價地(購買商品) Costing or worth little or no money
(Definition of cheap adjective (LOW PRICE) from the Cambridge English-Chinese (Traditional) Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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