hold noun (SUPPORT) translate to Traditional Chinese
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Translation of "hold" - English-Traditional Chinese dictionary

hold

noun (SUPPORT)
支撐
 
 
/həʊld/ US  /hoʊld/
[S or U] when you hold something or someone, or the way you do this
握,拿,抓
Keep a tight hold on your tickets.
拿好你們的票。
Don't worry if you lose hold of the reins - the horse won't wander off.
如果韁繩脫手也不用擔心——這匹馬是不會亂跑的。
→  See also foothold , handhold , toehold Having in your hands
catch/get/grab/take hold of sth/sb to start holding something or someone
抓住
He took hold of one end of the carpet and tugged.
他抓住地毯的一端用力拖。
I just managed to grab hold of Lucy before she fell in the pool.
我剛好在露西要掉進水池時抓住了她。
Having in your hands
[C] in fighting sports, a position in which one person holds another person so that they cannot move part of their body
擒拿法
WrestlingMartial arts
[C] a place to put the hands and feet, especially when climbing
(攀爬時的)支撐點,手攀(或腳踩)的地方
Mountaineering and rock climbing
(Definition of hold noun (SUPPORT) from the Cambridge English-Chinese (Traditional) Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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