wander verb (SUBJECT) translate to Traditional Chinese
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Translation of "wander" - English-Traditional Chinese dictionary

wander

verb [I] (SUBJECT)
主題
 
 
/ˈwɒn.dər/ US  /ˈwɑːn.dɚ/
to start talking about a different subject from the one you were originally discussing
離題
We've wandered off/from the point somewhat.
我們有點離題了。
Digressing and being indirect or evasiveMoving in order to avoid contactNot saying much
If your mind or your thoughts wander, you stop thinking about the subject that you should be giving your attention to and start thinking about other matters
走神,心不在焉;開小差
Halfway through the meeting my mind started to wander.
會開到一半時我就開始心不在焉了。
Not paying attentionTreating as unimportantNeglecting and ignoring
If you say that an old person's mind is beginning to wander, you mean that they are starting to get very confused because of their age
(因年老而)神志恍惚,精神錯亂
Her mind is beginning to wander and she doesn't always know who I am.
她的神志開始恍惚,有時認不出我是誰。
Of unsound mindStupid and silly
(Definition of wander verb (SUBJECT) from the Cambridge English-Chinese (Traditional) Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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