call translate English to French: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "call" - English-French dictionary

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call

verb /koːl/
to give a name to
appeler
My name is Alexander but I’m called Sandy by my friends
to regard (something) as
appeler
I saw you turn that card over – I call that cheating.
to speak loudly (to someone) to attract attention etc
appeler
Call everyone over here She called louder so as to get his attention.
to summon; to ask (someone) to come (by letter, telephone etc)
convoquer
They called him for an interview for the job He called a doctor.
to make a visit
passer
I shall call at your house this evening You were out when I called.
to telephone
téléphoner à
I’ll call you at 6 p.m.
(in card games) to bid.
annoncer, demander
caller noun
visiteur/-euse
calling noun a trade or profession
métier
Teaching is a worthwhile calling.
call-box noun a public telephone box.
cabine téléphonique
call for to demand or require
exiger
This calls for quick action.
to collect
passer prendre
I’ll call for you at eight o’clock.
call off to cancel
annuler
The party’s been called off.
call on to visit
aller voir
I’ll call on him tomorrow.
to ask someone to speak at a meeting etc.
donner la parole à
to ask someone publicly to something
demander
We call on both sides to stop the fighting.
call up to telephone (someone)
téléphoner à
He called me up from the airport.
give (someone) a call to telephone (someone)
téléphoner à
I’ll give you a call tomorrow.
on call keeping (oneself) ready to come out to an emergency
de garde
Which of the doctors is on call tonight?
(Definition of call from the Password English-French Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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