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French translation of “dig”

dig

verb /diɡ/ (present participle digging, past tense, past participle dug /daɡ/)
to turn up (earth) with a spade etc
bêcher
Alison is outside digging the garden.
to make (a hole) in this way
creuser
The child dug a tunnel in the sand.
to poke
enfoncer
He dug his brother in the ribs with his elbow.
digger noun a machine for digging.
excavatrice
a mechanical digger.
dig out to get out by digging
déterrer, sortir de
We had to dig the car out of the mud.
to find by searching
dénicher
I’ll see if I can dig out that photo.
dig up
arracher, déterrer
We dug up that old tree They dug up a skeleton They’re digging up the road yet again.
(Definition of dig from the Password English-French Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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