ground translate English to French: Cambridge Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Translation of "ground" - English-French dictionary

ground

noun /ɡraund/
the solid surface of the Earth sol She was lying on the ground high ground. a piece of land used for some purpose terrain a football ground. grounding noun the teaching of the basic facts of a subject enseignement des bases d’un sujet This course will give students a good grounding in mathematics. groundless adjective without reason sans fondement Your fears are groundless. grounds noun plural the garden or land round a large house etc parc the castle grounds. good reasons motif Have you any grounds for calling him a liar? the powder which remains in a cup (eg of coffee) which one has drunk marc (de café) coffee grounds. ground floor the rooms of a building which are at street level rez-de-chaussée My office is on the ground floor (also adjective) a ground-floor flat. groundwork noun work done in preparation for beginning a project etc. travail préparatoire We’ve completed most of the groundwork for our research project. break new ground to deal with a subject for the first time. innover Scientists have broken new ground in the field of human genetics. cover ground to deal with a certain amount of work etc faire du bon travail We’ve covered a lot of ground at this morning’s meeting. get (something) off the ground to get (a project etc) started. faire démarrer (qqch.) We’re hoping to get the project off the ground over the next few days. hold one’s ground to refuse to move back or retreat when attacked tenir bon Although many were killed, the soldiers held their ground. lose ground to (be forced to) move back or retreat perdre du terrain The general sent in reinforcements when he saw that his troops were losing ground.
(Definition of ground from the Password English-French Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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