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Translation of "hit" - English-French dictionary

hit

verb /hit/ ( present participle hitting, past tense, past participle hit)
to (cause or allow to) come into hard contact with frapper The ball hit him on the head He hit his head on/against a low branch The car hit a lamp-post He hit me on the head with a bottle He was hit by a bullet That boxer can certainly hit hard!
to make hard contact with (something), and force or cause it to move in some direction (r)envoyer The batsman hit the ball (over the wall).
to cause to suffer toucher The farmers were badly hit by the lack of rain Her husband’s death hit her hard.
to find; to succeed in reaching atteindre His second arrow hit the bull’s-eye Take the path across the fields and you’ll hit the road She used to be a famous soprano but she cannot hit the high notes now.
hit-and-run adjective
(of a driver) causing injury to a person and driving away without stopping or reporting the accident. coupable du délit de fuite
(of an accident) caused by such a driver. délit de fuite
hit-or-miss adjective
without any system or planning; careless n’importe comment hit-or-miss methods.
hit back
to hit (someone by whom one has been hit) rendre son coup (à) He hit me, so I hit him back.
hit below the belt
to hit in an unfair way. frapper au-dessous de la ceinture
hit it off
to become friendly s’entendre bien avec We hit it off as soon as we met I hit it off with him.
hit on
to find (an answer etc) trouver We’ve hit on the solution at last.
hit out ( often with against, or at)
to attempt to hit se débattre The injured man hit out blindly at his attackers.
make a hit with
to make oneself liked or approved of by faire sensation That young man has made a hit with your daughter.
(Definition of hit from the Password English-French Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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