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Translation of "restrict" - English-French dictionary

restrict

verb /rəˈstrikt/
to keep within certain limits restreindre, limiter (à) I try to restrict myself / my smoking to five cigarettes a day Use of the car-park is restricted to senior staff.
to make less than usual, desirable etc limiter He feels this new law will restrict his freedom.
restricted adjective
limited; narrow, small restreint a restricted space.
to which entry has been restricted to certain people restreint The battlefield was a restricted zone.
in which certain restrictions (eg a speed limit) apply réglementé, limité a restricted area.
restriction /-ʃən/ noun
a rule etc that limits or controls restriction, limitation Even in a free democracy a person’s behaviour must be subject to certain restrictions.
the act of restricting réduction restriction of freedom.
restrictive /-tiv/ adjective
restricting or intended to restrict. restrictif
(Definition of restrict from the Password English-French Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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