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French translation of “settle”

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settle

verb /ˈsetl/
to place in a position of rest or comfort
(s’)installer
I settled myself in the armchair.
to come to rest
se déposer (sur)
Dust had settled on the books.
to soothe
calmer
I gave him a pill to settle his nerves.
to go and live
s’établir
Many Scots settled in New Zealand.
to reach a decision or agreement
décider, régler
Have you settled with the builders when they are to start work? The dispute between management and employees is still not settled.
to pay (a bill)
régler
I just need to settle the hotel bill.
settlement noun an agreement The two sides have at last reached a settlement. a small community
colonie
a farming settlement.
settler noun a person who settles in a country that is being newly populated They were among the early settlers on the east coast of America. settle down to (cause to) become quiet, calm and peaceful
(se) calmer
He waited for the audience to settle down before he spoke She settled the baby down at last.
to make oneself comfortable
s’installer (confortablement)
She settled (herself) down in the back of the car and went to sleep.
to begin to concentrate on something, eg work
se mettre (sérieusement) à
He settled down to (do) his schoolwork.
settle in to become used to and comfortable in new surroundings.
s’adapter
settle on to agree about or decide
se mettre d’accord sur
Have you settled on a holiday destination yet?
settle up to pay (a bill)
régler
He asked the waiter for the bill, and settled up.
(Definition of settle from the Password English-French Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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