tear translate English to French: Cambridge Dictionary

Translation of "tear" - English-French dictionary


verb /teə/ ( past tense tore /toːn/, past participle torn /toː/)
(sometimes with offetc) to make a split or hole in (something), intentionally or unintentionally, with a sudden or violent pulling action, or to remove (something) from its position by such an action or movement
déchirer, arracher
He tore the photograph into pieces You’ve torn a hole in your jacket I tore the picture out of a magazine.
to become torn
se déchirer
Newspapers tear easily.
to rush
He tore along the road.
be torn between (one thing and another) to have a very difficult choice to make between (two things)
être déchiré entre (…) et (…)
He was torn between obedience to his parents and loyalty to his friends.
tear (oneself) away to leave a place, activity etc unwillingly
s’arracher à
I couldn’t tear myself away from the television.
tear one’s hair to be in despair with impatience and frustration
s’arracher les cheveux
Their inefficiency makes me tear my hair.
tear up to tear into pieces
She tore up the letter.
to remove from a fixed position by violence; The wind tore up several trees.
(Definition of tear from the Password English-French Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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