Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

French translation of “tear”

See all translations

tear

verb /teə/ ( past tense tore /toːn/, past participle torn /toː/)
(sometimes with offetc) to make a split or hole in (something), intentionally or unintentionally, with a sudden or violent pulling action, or to remove (something) from its position by such an action or movement
déchirer, arracher
He tore the photograph into pieces You’ve torn a hole in your jacket I tore the picture out of a magazine.
to become torn
se déchirer
Newspapers tear easily.
to rush
foncer
He tore along the road.
be torn between (one thing and another) to have a very difficult choice to make between (two things)
être déchiré entre (…) et (…)
He was torn between obedience to his parents and loyalty to his friends.
tear (oneself) away to leave a place, activity etc unwillingly
s’arracher à
I couldn’t tear myself away from the television.
tear one’s hair to be in despair with impatience and frustration
s’arracher les cheveux
Their inefficiency makes me tear my hair.
tear up to tear into pieces
déchirer
She tore up the letter.
to remove from a fixed position by violence; The wind tore up several trees.
arracher
(Definition of tear from the Password English-French Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “tear” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

white Christmas

a Christmas when it snows

Word of the Day

Cleavage proves divisive in Cambridge’s words of 2014

by Alastair Horne,
December 19, 2014
​​​​ Other dictionaries may choose faddish novelties as their words of the year, but here at Cambridge, we like to do something different. We look for the words that have seen sudden surges in searches over the course of the year – words that have been baffling users of English and driven them

Read More 

cinderella surgery noun

December 15, 2014
cosmetic surgery to the feet We have all heard of people having nose jobs, boob jobs and liposuction – but now a new trend growing in popularity in America: Cinderella surgery.

Read More