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German translation of “bring”

bring

verb /briŋ/ (past tense, past participle brought /broːt/)
to make (something or someone) come (to or towards a place)
bringen
I’ll bring plenty of food with me Bring him to me!
to result in
bringen
This medicine will bring you relief.
bring about to cause
zustande bringen
His disregard for danger brought about his death.
bring back to (cause to) return
zurückbringen
She brought back the umbrella she had borrowed Her singing brings back memories of my mother.
bring down to cause to fall
stürzen
The storm brought all the trees down.
bring home to to prove or show (something) clearly to (someone)
jemandem etwas klar machen
His illness brought home to her how much she depended on him.
bring off to achieve (something attempted)
schaffen
They brought off an unexpected victory.
bring round to bring back from unconsciousness
wieder zu sich bringen
The fresh air brought him round after he had fainted.
bring up to rear or educate
erziehen
Her parents brought her up to be polite.
to introduce (a matter) for discussion
zur Sprache bringen
Bring the matter up at the next meeting.
bring towards the speaker: Mary, bring me some coffee. take away from the speaker: Take these cups away. fetch from somewhere else and bring to the speaker: Fetch me my book from the bedroom.
(Definition of bring from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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