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German translation of “call”

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call

verb /koːl/
to give a name to
rufen
My name is Alexander but I’m called Sandy by my friends
to regard (something) as
bezeichnen als
I saw you turn that card over – I call that cheating.
to speak loudly (to someone) to attract attention etc
rufen
Call everyone over here She called louder so as to get his attention.
to summon; to ask (someone) to come (by letter, telephone etc)
anfragen, kommen lassen
They called him for an interview for the job He called a doctor.
to make a visit
kurz besuchen
I shall call at your house this evening You were out when I called.
to telephone
anrufen
I’ll call you at 6 p.m.
(in card games) to bid.
die Farbe ansagen
caller noun
der/die Anrufer(in)
calling noun a trade or profession
der Beruf
Teaching is a worthwhile calling.
call-box noun a public telephone box.
die Fernsprechzelle
call for to demand or require
erfordern
This calls for quick action.
to collect
abholen
I’ll call for you at eight o’clock.
call off to cancel
absagen
The party’s been called off.
call on to visit
besuchen
I’ll call on him tomorrow.
to ask someone to speak at a meeting etc.
besuchen
to ask someone publicly to something
öffentlich auffrufen
We call on both sides to stop the fighting.
call up to telephone (someone)
anrufen
He called me up from the airport.
give (someone) a call to telephone (someone)
anrufen
I’ll give you a call tomorrow.
on call keeping (oneself) ready to come out to an emergency
auf Abruf
Which of the doctors is on call tonight?
(Definition of call from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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