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Translation of "enter" - English-German dictionary

enter

verb /ˈentə/
to go or come in eintreten Enter by this door.
to come or go into (a place) eintreten He entered the room.
to give the name of (another person or oneself) for a competition etc anmelden He entered for the race I entered my pupils for the examination.
to write (one’s name etc) in a book etc eintragen Did you enter your name in the visitors’ book?
to start in anfangen She entered his employment last week.
enter into
to take part in einen Vertrag, etc. schließen He entered into an agreement with the film director.
to take part enthusiastically in sich hineinversetzen in They entered into the Christmas spirit.
to begin to discuss eingehen auf We cannot enter into the question of salaries yet.
to be a part of eingehen in The price did not enter into the discussion.
enter on/upon
to begin beginnen We have entered upon a new era for our nation.
to enter (not enter into) a room.
(Definition of enter from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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