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Translation of "full" - English-German dictionary

full

adjective /ful/
holding or containing as much as possible voll My basket is full. complete vollständig, ganz a full year a full account of what happened. (of clothes) containing a large amount of material weit a full skirt. fully adverb completely völlig He was fully aware of what was happening fully-grown dogs. quite; at least voll It will take fully three days. full-length adjective complete; of the usual or standard length vollständig a full-length novel. down to the feet lebensgroß a full-length portrait. full moon (the time of) the moon when it appears at its most complete der Vollmond There is a full moon tonight. full-scale adjective (of a drawing etc) of the same size as the subject in natürlicher Größe a full-scale drawing of a flower. full stop a written or printed point (.) marking the end of a sentence; a period. der Punkt full-time adjective, adverb occupying one’s working time completely hauptberuflich a full-time job She works full-time now. fully-fledged adjective (as in bird) having grown its feathers and ready to fly. flügge fully trained, qualified etc vollständig ausgebildet He’s now a fully-fledged teacher. full of filled with; containing or holding very much or very many voller The bus was full of people. completely concerned with voll von She rushed into the room, full of the news. in full completely in voller Länge, Höhe Write your name in full He paid his bill in full. to the full to the greatest possible extent bis ins kleinste She always tries to enjoy life to the full.
(Definition of full from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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