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Translation of "ground" - English-German dictionary

ground

noun /ɡraund/
the solid surface of the Earth der (Erd)Boden She was lying on the ground high ground.
a piece of land used for some purpose das Gebiet a football ground.
grounding noun
the teaching of the basic facts of a subject der Anfangsunterricht This course will give students a good grounding in mathematics.
groundless adjective
without reason grundlos Your fears are groundless.
grounds noun plural
the garden or land round a large house etc die Anlagen (pl.) the castle grounds.
good reasons der Grund Have you any grounds for calling him a liar?
the powder which remains in a cup (eg of coffee) which one has drunk der Kaffeesatz coffee grounds.
ground floor
the rooms of a building which are at street level das Erdgeschoß My office is on the ground floor (also adjective) a ground-floor flat.
groundwork noun
work done in preparation for beginning a project etc. das Fundament We’ve completed most of the groundwork for our research project.
break new ground
to deal with a subject for the first time. neue Gebiete erschließen Scientists have broken new ground in the field of human genetics.
cover ground
to deal with a certain amount of work etc vorwärtskommen We’ve covered a lot of ground at this morning’s meeting.
get (something) off the ground
to get (a project etc) started. in Gang setzen We’re hoping to get the project off the ground over the next few days.
hold one’s ground
to refuse to move back or retreat when attacked standhalten Although many were killed, the soldiers held their ground.
lose ground
to (be forced to) move back or retreat an Boden verlieren The general sent in reinforcements when he saw that his troops were losing ground.
(Definition of ground from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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