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German translation of “notice”

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notice

noun /ˈnəutis/
a written or printed statement to announce something publicly
die Notiz
He stuck a notice on the door, saying that he had gone home They put a notice in the paper announcing the birth of their daughter.
attention
die Aufmerksamkeit; die Kenntnis
His skill attracted their notice I’ll bring the problem to his notice as soon as possible.
warning given especially before leaving a job or dismissing someone
die Warnung
Her employer gave her a month’s notice The cook gave in her notice Please give notice of your intentions.
noticeable adjective (likely to be) easily noticed
wahrnehmbar
There’s a slight stain on this dress, but it’s not really noticeable.
noticeably adverb
merklich
This ball of wool is noticeably darker than these others.
noticed adjective (negative unnoticed).
beachtet
noticeboard noun ( American bulletin board) a usually large board eg in a hall, school etc on which notices are put
das Anschlagbrett
She left a message on the school noticeboard.
at short notice without much warning time for preparation etc
sofort
He had to make the speech at very short notice when his boss suddenly fell ill.
take notice of to pay attention to
beachten
He never takes any notice of what his father says Take no notice of gossip.
(Definition of notice from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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