pass translate English to German: Cambridge Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Translation of "pass" - English-German dictionary

pass

verb /paːs/
to move towards and then beyond (something, by going past, through, by, over etc) vorbeigehen I pass the shops on my way to work The procession passed along the corridor.
to move, give etc from one person, state etc to another weitergeben They passed the photographs around The tradition is passed (on/down) from father to son.
to go or be beyond übersteigen This passes my understanding.
(of vehicles etc on a road) to overtake überholen The sports car passed me on a dangerous bend in the road.
to spend (time) verbringen They passed several weeks in the country.
(of an official group, government etc) to accept or approve annehmen The government has passed a resolution.
to give or announce (a judgement or sentence) fällen The magistrate passed judgement on the prisoner.
to end or go away vorübergehen His sickness soon passed.
to (judge to) be successful in (an examination etc) bestehen I passed my driving test.
passable adjective
fairly good passabel a passable tennis player.
(of a river, road etc) able to be passed, travelled over etc passierbar The mud has made the roads no longer passable.
passing adjective
going past vorbei-… a passing car.
lasting only a short time vorübergehend a passing interest.
(of something said) casual and not made as part of a serious talk about the subject beiläufig a passing reference.
passer-by noun ( plural passers-by)
a person who is going past a place when something happens der/die Passant(in) He asked the passers-by if they had seen the accident.
password noun
a secret word by which those who know it can recognize each other and be allowed to go past, enter etc die Losung He was not allowed into the army camp because he did not know the password.
in passing
while doing or talking about something else; without explaining fully what one means beiläufig He told her the story, and said in passing that he did not completely believe it.
let (something) pass
to ignore something rather than take the trouble to argue durchgehen lassen I’ll let that pass.
pass as/for
to be mistaken for or accepted as angesehen werden als Some man-made materials could pass as silk His nasty remarks pass for wit among his admirers.
pass away
to die verscheiden Her grandmother passed away last night.
pass the buck
to give the responsibility or blame for something to someone else den schwarzen Peter weitergeben She always passes the buck if she is asked to do anything.
pass by
to go past (a particular place) vorübergehen I was passing by when the bride arrived at the church She passed by the hospital on the way to the library.
pass off
(of sickness, an emotion etc) to go away vergehen By the evening, his sickness had passed off and he felt better.
pass (something or someone) off as
to pretend that (something or someone) is (something or someone else) sich ausgeben als He passed himself off as a journalist.
pass on
to give to someone else (usually something which one has been given by a third person) weitergeben I passed on his message.
to die verscheiden His mother passed on yesterday.
pass out
to faint ohnmächtig werden I feel as though I’m going to pass out.
to give to several different people ausgeben The teacher passed out books to her class.
pass over
to ignore or overlook übergehen They passed him over for promotion.
pass up
not to accept (a chance, opportunity etc) ablehnen He passed up the offer of a good job.
passed is the past tense of to pass: He passed the scene of the accident. past means up to and beyond: She walked past the shops.
(Definition of pass from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

nutty

containing, tasting of, or similar to nuts

Word of the Day

bio-banding noun
bio-banding noun
April 25, 2016
in sport, grouping children according to their physical maturity rather than their age ‘When we’re grouping children for sports, we do it by age groups, but the problem is that, within those age groups, we get huge variations in biological age,’ said Dr Sean Cumming, senior lecturer at the University of Bath’s department for

Read More