private translate English to German: Cambridge Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Translation of "private" - English-German dictionary

private

adjective /ˈpraivət/
of, for, or belonging to, one person or group, not to the general public
privat
The headmaster lives in a private apartment in the school in my private (=personal) opinion This information is to be kept strictly private You shouldn’t listen to private conversations.
having no public or official position or rank
Privat-…
It is your duty as a private citizen to report this matter to the police.
privacy /ˈprivəsi, (American) ˈprai-/ noun the state of being away from other people’s sight or interest
die Zurückgezogenheit
in the privacy of your own home.
privately adverb
privat
private enterprise the management and financing of industry etc by individual persons or companies and not by the state.
freie Wirtschaft
private means money that does not come from one’s work but from investment, inheritance etc.
das Privatvermögen
in private with no-one else listening or watching; not in public
unter vier Augen
May I speak to you in private?
(Definition of private from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day
public school

in England, an expensive type of private school (= school paid for by parents not by the government)

Word of the Day

Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
by ,
August 27, 2015
The English language is constantly changing. You know that. But did you know that at Cambridge Dictionaries Online we keep track of the changes? We continually add new words and new meanings to our online dictionary for learners of English. Some of them are new to English entirely (neologisms), and some are new to our

Read More 

hyperpalatable adjective
hyperpalatable adjective
August 24, 2015
describes food with heightened levels of sugar and salt, intended to be extremely appealing In Brazil, where the prevalence of overweight and obese adults has doubled since 1980, crisps, biscuits, energy bars and sugary drinks formulated to be ‘hyper-palatable’ are much more widely eaten than previously.

Read More