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Translation of "record" - English-German dictionary

record

noun /ˈrekoːd, -kəd, (American) -kərd/
a written report of facts, events etc die Aufzeichnung historical records I wish to keep a record of everything that is said at this meeting.
a round flat piece of (usually black) plastic on which music etc is recorded die Platte a record of Beethoven’s Sixth Symphony.
(in races, games, or almost any activity) the best performance so far; something which has never yet been beaten der Rekord, Rekord… He holds the record for the 1,000 metres The record for the high jump was broken/beaten this afternoon He claimed to have eaten fifty sausages in a minute and asked if this was a record (also adjective) a record score.
the collected facts from the past of a person, institution etc das Register This school has a very poor record of success in exams He has a criminal record.
recorder noun
a type of musical wind instrument, made of wood, plastic etc. die Blockflöte
an instrument for recording on to tape. das Aufnahmegerät
recording noun
something recorded on tape, a record etc die Aufzeichnung This is a recording of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony.
record player noun
an electrical instrument which reproduces the sounds recorded on records. der Plattenspieler
in record time
very quickly in Rekordzeit She won the race in record time.
off the record
(of information, statements etc) not intended to be repeated or made public inoffiziell The Prime Minister admitted off the record that the country was going through a serious crisis.
on record
recorded bisher This is the coldest winter on record.
(Definition of record from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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