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German translation of “shoot”

shoot

verb /ʃuːt/ (past tense, past participle shot /ʃot/)
(often with at) to send or fire (bullets, arrows etc) from a gun, bow etc
schießen
The enemy were shooting at us He shot an arrow through the air.
to hit or kill with a bullet, arrow etc
(er-)schießen
He went out to shoot pigeons He was sentenced to be shot at dawn.
to direct swiftly and suddenly
senden
She shot them an angry glance.
to move swiftly
schießen
He shot out of the room The pain shot up his leg The force of the explosion shot him across the room.
to take (usually moving) photographs (for a film)
drehen
That film was shot in Spain We will start shooting next week.
to kick or hit at a goal in order to try to score
schießen
He shot from just outside the penalty box.
to kill (game birds etc) for sport.
jagen
shoot down to hit (a plane) with eg a shell and cause it to crash
abschießen
They shot down one of the enemy planes.
shoot rapids to pass through rapids (in a canoe).
über eine Stromschnelle hinwegschießen
shoot up to grow or increase rapidly
in die Höhe schießen
Prices have shot up.
(Definition of shoot from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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