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German translation of “tail”

tail

noun /teil/
the part of an animal, bird or fish that sticks out behind the rest of its body
der Schwanz
The dog wagged its tail A fish swims by moving its tail.
anything which has a similar function or position
der Schwanz
the tail of an aeroplane/comet.
-tailed having a (certain size, type etc of) tail
schwänzig
a black-tailed duck a long-tailed dog.
tails noun, adverb (on) the side of a coin that does not have the head of the sovereign etc on it
die Münzenrückseite
He tossed the coin and it came up tails.
tail-end noun the very end or last part
der Schluß
the tail-end of the procession.
tail light noun the (usually red) light on the back of a car, train etc
das Rücklicht
He followed the tail lights of the bus.
tailwind a wind coming from behind
der Rückenwind
We sailed home with a tailwind.
tail off to become fewer, smaller or weaker (at the end)
abflauen
His interest tailed off towards the end of the film.
(also tail away) (of voices etc) to become quieter or silent
abflauen
His voice tailed away into silence.
(Definition of tail from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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