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German translation of “top”

top

noun /top/
the highest part of anything
die Spitze
the top of the hill the top of her head.
the position of the cleverest in a class etc
die Spitze
He’s at the top of the class.
the upper surface
die Oberfläche
the table-top.
a lid
der Deckel
I’ve lost the top to this jar a bottle-top.
a (woman’s) garment for the upper half of the body; a blouse, sweater etc
das Sonnentop
I bought a new skirt and top.
topless adjective having no top
ohne Spitze
very high.
unermeßlich hoch
topping noun something that forms a covering on top of something, especially food
die Spitze
a tart with a topping of cream.
top hat /ˈtopə/ abbreviation (topper) a man’s tall hat, worn as formal dress
der Zylinder
He was wearing a top hat and tails.
top-heavy adjective having the upper part too heavy for the lower
kopflastig
That pile of books is top-heavy – it’ll fall over!
top-secret adjective very secret
streng geheim
top-secret information.
at the top of one’s voice very loudly
aus vollem Halse
They were shouting at the top(s) of their voices.
be/feel etc on top of the world to feel very well and happy
aufbrechen
She’s on top of the world – she’s just got engaged to be married.
from top to bottom completely
von oben bis unten
They’ve painted the house from top to bottom.
the top of the ladder/tree the highest point in one’s profession.
der Gipfel des Erfolgs
top up to fill (a cup etc that has been partly emptied) to the top
auffüllen
Let me top up your glass/drink.
(Definition of top from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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