Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

German translation of “tune”

tune

noun /tjuːn/
musical notes put together in a particular (melodic and pleasing) order; a melody
die Melodie
He played a tune on the violin.
tuneful adjective having a good, clear, pleasant etc tune
melodisch
That song is very tuneful.
tunefully adverb
melodisch
tunefulness noun
die Melodik
tuneless adjective without a good etc tune; unmusical
unmelodisch
The child was singing in a tuneless voice.
tunelessly adverb
unmelodisch
tunelessness noun
das Unmelodische
tuner noun (also piano-tuner) a person whose profession is tuning pianos.
der/die Instrumentenstimmer(in)
the dial on a radio etc used to tune in to the different stations.
der Tuner
a radio which is part of a stereo system.
der Tuner
change one’s tune to change one’s attitude, opinions etc
seine Einstellung ändern
He soon changed his tune when he realized tha there was money to be mede from the situation.
in tune (of a musical instrument) having been adjusted so as to give the correct pitches
richtig gestimmt
Is the violin in tune with the piano?
(of a person’s singing voice) at the same pitch as that of other voices or instruments
richtige Tonhöhe
Someone in the choir isn’t (singing) in tune.
out of tune not in tune
verstimmt
She was singing out of tune.
tune in to tune a radio (to a particular station or programme)
einstellen
We usually tune (the radio) in to the news.
tune up (of an orchestra etc) to tune instruments
stimmen
The band were tuning up just before the performance.
(Definition of tune from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

More translations of “tune” in German

Definitions of “tune” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

hello stranger

said to a person that you know but have not seen for a long time

Word of the Day

Come on – you can do it! Phrasal verbs with ‘come’.

by Liz Walter​,
November 19, 2014
As part of an occasional series on the tricky subject of phrasal verbs, this blog looks at ones formed with the verb ‘come’. If you are reading this blog, I’m sure you already know come from, as it is one of the first things you learn in class: I come from Scotland/Spain.

Read More 

silver splicer noun

November 17, 2014
informal a person who marries in later life Newly retired and now newlywed – rise of the ‘silver splicers’ Reaching pension age becomes a trigger to tie the knot as baby-boomers begin to redefine retirement

Read More