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Translation of "where" - English-German dictionary

where

adverb /weə/
(to or in) which place (?) wo(-hin, -her) Where are you going (to)? Do you know where we are? Where does he get his ideas from? We asked where to find a good restaurant. whereabouts adverb near or in what place(?) wo ungefähr Whereabouts is it? I don’t know whereabouts it is. whereabouts noun singular or plural the place where a person or thing is der Aufenthaltsort I don’t know his whereabouts. whereas conjunction when in fact; but on the other hand wohingegen He thought I was lying, whereas I was telling the truth. whereby relative pronoun by which durch welche/n/s We made a deal whereby he would have to deliver the goods by the end of the month. whereupon conjunction at or after which time, event etc worauf He insulted her, whereupon she slapped him. wherever relative pronoun no matter where wo auch immer I’ll follow you wherever you may go Wherever he is he will be thinking of you. (to or in) any place that ganz gleich wo Go wherever he tells you to go.
Translations of “where”
in Arabic أيْن…
in Korean 어디에…
in Malaysian di manakah…
in French oû…
in Turkish nerede…
in Italian dove…
in Chinese (Traditional) 去哪裡, 在哪裡, 處於某種階段…
in Russian где?…
in Polish gdzie…
in Vietnamese ở đâu…
in Spanish dónde…
in Portuguese onde, aonde…
in Thai ที่ไหน…
in Catalan on…
in Japanese どこに(へ、を、で)…
in Indonesian ke mana, di mana, dari mana…
in Chinese (Simplified) 去哪里, 在哪里, 处于某种阶段…
(Definition of where from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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