do verb translate English to Italian: Cambridge Dictionary

Translation of "do" - English-Italian dictionary


/duː/ ( present participle doing, past tense did, past participle done)
A1 to perform an action
Go upstairs and do your homework.
A1 to perform a type of exercise or activity
She does yoga three times a week.
A2 to make or prepare something
Max’s Café does great sandwiches.
A2 used for talking or asking about how healthy, happy, or successful someone is
andare, cavarsela
“How is your niece doing?” “She’s doing really well, thanks.”
A1 UK to study a subject
Diana did history at university.
do the cleaning, cooking, etc. A1 to perform a job in the house
fare le pulizie, fare da mangiare, ecc.
I do the cooking, but Joe does most of the cleaning.
what do you, does she, etc. do? A1 used to ask what someone’s job is
che cosa fai, fa, ecc. di lavoro?
“What do you do?” “I’m a doctor.”
do badly/well B1 to not succeed, or to succeed
riuscire male/bene
Sam did very well in his exam.
do your hair, make-up, etc. B1 to make your hair, make-up, etc. look nice
farsi i capelli, il trucco, ecc.
It takes him half an hour to do his hair in the morning.
do your hair, makeup, etc. to make your hair, makeup, etc. look nice
farsi i capelli, il trucco, ecc.
I need to do my hair before we go out.
be/have to do with something to be related to something
avere a che fare con qualcosa
She lacks confidence and I think that has to do with her childhood.
have to do with something to be related to something
avere a che fare con qualcosa
Our profits are down, which has to do with poor sales.
do someone good to have a good effect on someone
fare bene a qualcuno, giovare a qualcuno
A holiday would do you good.
will do will be satisfactory
essere sufficiente
You don’t have to pay now. Next week will do.
could do with someone/something to need or want someone or something
fare caso di qualcuno o qualcosa (espresso al condizionale)
I could do with a few days off work.
(Definition of do verb from the Cambridge English-Italian Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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