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Italian translation of “feel”

feel

verb
 
/fiːl/ (past tense and past participle felt)
A1 to experience happiness, sadness, fear, etc.
sentire, sentirsi
I feel guilty about shouting at her. He’s feeling lonely. I felt sorry for her.
A1 to experience a touch, a pain, or something else that is physical
sentire
I felt a sharp pain in my foot. Do you feel sick?
B1 to have an opinion about something
ritenere, pensare
I feel that she’s the best person for the job.
feel like something B1 to seem to be similar to a type of person, thing, or situation
sembrare qualcosa
Your hands feel like ice.
feel as if/feel like… B1 to have a feeling or idea about something that you have experienced, even though it might not be true
sentirsi come se…/sentirsi come…
It feels like I’ve been here forever, but it’s only been a week.
feel like something B1 to want something
aver voglia di qualcosa
I feel like a sandwich.
feel like doing something B1 to want to do something
sentire la voglia di fare qualcosa
Jane felt like crying.
to touch something in order to examine it
sentire, palpare
He felt her ankle to see if it was broken.
feel different, strange, etc. If a place, situation, etc. feels different, strange, etc., that is how it seems to you.
sembrare diverso, strano, ecc.
It felt strange to see him again after so long. The house feels empty without the kids.
(Definition of feel from the Cambridge English-Italian Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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