up adverb, preposition - Definition in the Cambridge English-Italian Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Italian translation of “up”

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up

adverb, preposition
 
/ʌp/
A2 towards or in a higher place
su, su per, in su, verso l’alto
He ran up the stairs. She looked up and smiled at me.
A1 to or towards a position that is vertical or as straight as possible
su
He stood up. She sat up.
to a greater degree, amount, volume, etc.
su (di volume, quantità, ecc.)
Can you turn up the heat?
used to say that someone completes an action or uses all of something
usato con verbi per indicare il significato di “completamente”
I used up all my money. Eat up the rest of your dinner.
up the road, street, etc. A2 along or further along the street, road, etc.
più su lungo la strada
They live just up the road.
go, walk, etc. up to someone/something B1 to walk directly towards someone or something until you are next to them
avvicinarsi a qualcuno/qualcosa
He came straight up to me and introduced himself.
up to 10, 20, etc. B1 any amount under 10, 20, etc.
fino a 10, 20, ecc.
We can invite up to 65 people.
up to/till/until B1 until a particular time
fino a
You can call me up till midnight.
be up to someone B1 If an action or decision is up to someone, they are responsible for doing or making it.
spettare a qualcuno
I can’t decide for you. It’s up to you.
be up to something informal B1 to be doing or planning something bad
tramare qualcosa, combinare qualcosa
What are you two up to?
(Definition of up adverb, preposition from the Cambridge English-Italian Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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