after preposition translate to Japanese: Cambridge Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Translation of "after" - English-Japanese dictionary

after

preposition   /ˈɑːf·tər/
A1 following something that has happened ~の後に(で) We went swimming after lunch.
A2 following in order ~の次に H comes after G in the alphabet.
A2 once you have passed a particular place ~を通り過ぎた所に(で) Turn left after the hotel.
B1 following someone or something ~の後ろを追って We ran after him.
because of something that happened ~以来, ~以降, ~があってからは I’ll never trust her again after what she did to me.
although something happened or is true; despite ~にもかかわらず, ~だというのに I can’t believe he was so rude to you after all the help you gave him!
US used to say how many minutes past the hour it is (~時)~分過ぎ It’s five after three.
after all
B1 used to add an explanation to something that you have just said 結局, つまるところ, なんと言っても You can’t expect to be perfect – after all, it was only your first lesson.
day after day, year after year, etc.
B1 happening every day, year, etc., over a long period 毎日毎日(毎年毎年), 来る日(年)も来る日(年)も We go to the same place on holiday year after year.
be after something
to be trying to get something ~を求める, ~を探す What type of job are you after?
(Definition of after preposition from the Cambridge English-Japanese Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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