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Translation of "draw" - English-Korean dictionary

draw

verb   /drɔː/ ( past tense drew, past participle drawn)
A1 to make a picture with a pen or pencil 그림을 그리다 She drew a picture of a tree.
to attract someone to a place or person (마음을) 끌다 He’s an excellent speaker who always draws a crowd.
to move somewhere, usually in a vehicle 이동하다 The train drew into the station.
to pull something or someone in a particular direction 끌어 당기다 He took her hand and drew her towards him.
draw near/close
to become nearer in space or time 다가오다 Her wedding is drawing nearer every day.
draw attention to someone/something
to make someone notice something or someone 주의를 끌다 We think she wears those strange clothes to draw attention to herself.
draw the curtains
to pull curtains open or closed 커튼을 치다
( also draw out) to take money from your bank account 돈을 인출하다
UK to finish a game or competition with each team or player having the same score 비기다 England drew 2–2 against Italy.
(Definition of draw from the Cambridge English-Korean Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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