Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Korean translation of “feel”

feel

verb
 
/fiːl/ (past tense and past participle felt)
A1 to experience happiness, sadness, fear, etc.
(행복, 슬픔, 두려움 마음이) 들다
I feel guilty about shouting at her. He’s feeling lonely. I felt sorry for her.
A1 to experience a touch, a pain, or something else that is physical
(고통, 촉감등을) 느끼다
I felt a sharp pain in my foot. Do you feel sick?
B1 to have an opinion about something
-라고 생각하다
I feel that she’s the best person for the job.
feel like something B1 to seem to be similar to a type of person, thing, or situation
-같은 느낌이 들다
Your hands feel like ice.
feel as if/feel like… B1 to have a feeling or idea about something that you have experienced, even though it might not be true
마치 – 같다
It feels like I’ve been here forever, but it’s only been a week.
feel like something B1 to want something
- 를 원하다
I feel like a sandwich.
feel like doing something B1 to want to do something
-하고 싶다
Jane felt like crying.
to touch something in order to examine it
손으로 더듬다
He felt her ankle to see if it was broken.
feel different, strange, etc. If a place, situation, etc. feels different, strange, etc., that is how it seems to you.
-인 것 같다
It felt strange to see him again after so long. The house feels empty without the kids.
(Definition of feel from the Cambridge English-Korean Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “feel” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

hello stranger

said to a person that you know but have not seen for a long time

Word of the Day

Come on – you can do it! Phrasal verbs with ‘come’.

by Liz Walter​,
November 19, 2014
As part of an occasional series on the tricky subject of phrasal verbs, this blog looks at ones formed with the verb ‘come’. If you are reading this blog, I’m sure you already know come from, as it is one of the first things you learn in class: I come from Scotland/Spain.

Read More 

silver splicer noun

November 17, 2014
informal a person who marries in later life Newly retired and now newlywed – rise of the ‘silver splicers’ Reaching pension age becomes a trigger to tie the knot as baby-boomers begin to redefine retirement

Read More